United Legal Team, LLC

Americans with Disabilities

The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed to eliminate the persistent discrimination against disabled individuals. Many businesses and individuals continue to ignore the spirit and purpose of this important law.

ADA was designed to prohibit disability discrimination.

The Americans with Disabilities Act is a civil rights law. Civil rights laws afford protection and freedom to covered individuals, which allows them to freely participate in society without the worry of discrimination or oppression. We have handled hundreds of these cases and we are serious about equality.

Disabled individuals should not be discriminated against because of their disability with regards to full and equal enjoyment of goods, services, facilities, or accommodations of any place of public accommodation.

Whether it is equal access to employment with reasonable accommodations, businesses open to the public, or public accommodations including websites, Americans with disabilities are covered. Disabilities include both mental and physical medical conditions.

Often overlooked disabilities are epilepsy, PTSD, mobility impairments, and conditions that are not permanent. Disabilities need not be severe or permanent for coverage to extend. If you have experienced discrimination with equal and full access we are here to help.

Website Accessibility

Screen reader software programs are the equivalent of a guide dog for the visually impaired on the internet. These programs are vital and unavoidable for the visually impaired. Websites that aren’t fully accessible to these programs effectively disregard the visually impaired. Accessibility to websites and mobile apps is the practice of removing barriers that would prevent individuals with visual impairments like blindness, low vision, epilepsy, poor eyesight, and colorblindness from fully enjoying equal use, access, and functionality.

Inclusively designed websites are created with equal access in mind. Individuals with disabilities like deafness and hard of hearing are also individuals that benefit greatly from websites or mobile apps that are correctly produced and adequately developed.

Developing websites that include the disabled is an excellent business practice because it expands the potential consumer base and influence of the business. A website that discriminates against the disabled is naturally is smaller and a liability.

Website Accessibility

Screen reader software programs are the equivalent of a guide dog for the visually impaired on the internet. These programs are vital and unavoidable for the visually impaired. Websites that aren’t fully accessible to these programs effectively disregard the visually impaired. Accessibility to websites and mobile apps is the practice of removing barriers that would prevent individuals with visual impairments like blindness, low vision, epilepsy, poor eyesight, and colorblindness from fully enjoying equal use, access, and functionality.

Inclusively designed websites are created with equal access in mind. Individuals with disabilities like deafness and hard of hearing are also individuals that benefit greatly from websites or mobile apps that are correctly produced and adequately developed.

Developing websites that include the disabled is an excellent business practice because it expands the potential consumer base and influence of the business. A website that discriminates against the disabled is naturally is smaller and a liability.

Public Accessibility

Title III of the Americans With Disabilities Act covers access to public accommodations. A place of public accommodation means any place that is open to the public where things are bought or sold, or when services are bought or sold. In short, all organizations need to comply with Title III of the accessibility guidelines, protecting the civil rights of every individual with a different basis of disability. Examples include banks, restaurants, theaters, hotels, and more. Also included are schools, colleges, museums, shopping malls, bowling alleys, and sports arenas, as well as spas, hospitals, and zoos, which are all places of public accommodation, including private transportation.

Title III requires that places of public accommodation not discriminate based on disability in providing goods and services. It also requires that they remove all structural and architectural barriers to accessibility if such removal is readily achievable, and that new construction and alterations comply with the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.

People with disabilities should have the opportunity to enjoy the same access to the physical buildings, goods and services, and other benefits, offered by businesses as anyone else. If you feel that you or a loved one have been discriminated against because of a disability, contact us to learn about your rights under the ADA.